Jungian Concepts Seminar IV: Full Series

  • October 30, 2015
    7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

CEUs: 2/session for 12 total

*6 Fridays: Oct 30, Nov 20, 2015, Jan 29, Feb 26, April 29, May 27, 2016

Instructors: Laura McGrew, Lorna Crowl, Jane Kamerling, Bob MorettiJudy Shaw, & Ken James

 $150  for full series

This year’s Jungian Concepts Seminar is being presented by six seasoned Jungian analysts.   This seminar is open to anyone interested in exploring Jung’s concepts, and is suitable for both new and returning participants, clinicians and non-clinicians. Questions and discussion will be welcome at each session. Topics to be covered are as follows:

October 30: Inflation:  A Critical Element in One’s Individuation, Laura McGrew, LCPC
While we may reveal to a friend when we have been depressed, we rarely tell another, “I’ve been really inflated lately.”  … and yet we suffer in both realities.  Inflation is a devious, deceptive psychological state to discover in one’s self; it is painful, confusing, and isolating. It often appears in drag. In this seminar, we shall discuss the nature of inflation – both its positive and negatives aspects – and why our awareness of its existence in ourselves at different times in our lives is critical to our individuation process. Please bring paper and pencils.

November 20: The Transpersonal Dimension to Human Experience, Lorna Crowl, LCSW
Transpersonal experiences are those in which the sense of identity with self extends beyond the individual to encompass wider aspects of humankind, life, psyche or cosmos. From a Jungian perspective, these include a number of spiritual, paranormal and transcendental experiences including ESP phenomenon, ego transcendence, and other states of expanded consciousness. Due to the “woo woo” nature of these phenomena, we in Western society may deny these experiences when they occur, or feel reluctant to share them, lest we be deemed “nuts”. In this seminar, you will be provided with a theoretical underpinning of the transpersonal aspect to life as well as have ample time to come out of the closet to claim and share your transpersonal experiences with others.

January 29: Jungian Dreamwork, Jane Kamerling, LCSW
This session will provide an overview of how to interpret dreams from a Jungian perspective.  We will begin with an overview of the theory of Jungian dreamwork, and then practice working with actual dreams.  Participants are invited to bring dreams to discuss during experiential exercises, which are designed to allow exploration of dreams in more depth, and help participants begin to understand the meaning, which can be created from practicing dreamwork.

February 26: The Ego’s Role in Individuation , Bob Moretti, PhD
C.G. Jung understood that there is a wisdom in the psyche that is different from that of ego consciousness, and his analytical psychology provided a method for accessing that wisdom via exploration of the unconscious.  By contrast, popular modern psychotherapy, as exemplified by cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), places great emphasis upon working with ego consciousness to reduce symptoms.  Are these approaches therefore opposed to each other?  For all of the emphasis on exploration of the unconscious in Jung’s approach, ego consciousness cannot be neglected. What, exactly, is the proper role of the conscious mind in Jungian analysis?  Are there specific ways to foster this role?  Should Jungian therapists recommend such methods?  Why is consideration of the conscious mind’s role so little discussed in Jungian circles? Following a brief presentation, the ample remaining time will be opened to questions and discussion.

April 29: Transformation. Judy Shaw, LCSW
Phases of transformation include dying and death. This will be a discussion of one’s understanding and acceptance of “jeopardy,” knowing neither the day nor the hour of our deaths, and how that informs the ways in which we allow ourselves to evolve and develop. Come ready to participate in an exercise; please bring a brown paper bag, a pencil and some curiosity.

May 27: Struggling with The Self and the Role of the Ego, Ken James, PhD
One of the most controversial elements of Jung’s theory of psyche is his postulation of the Self, and the relationship between the Ego and the Self.  In this evening’s session, we will examine briefly how different Analytical Psychologists understand this relationship. We will then engage in reflective communal discussion in order to deeper our appreciation of this most enigmatic element of Jungian thought.

Venue:  

Venue Phone: 847-475-4848 *221

Venue Website:

Address:
817 Dempster St., Evanston, Illinois, 60201, United States